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HIGH-THROUGHPUT SCREENING SERVICES
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The high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory, which is part of the Center for High-Throughput Structural Biology (CHTSB) at the Hauptman-Woodward Institute (HWI), will prepare crystal-growth screening experiments in 1536-well microassay plates for a nominal fee.  (This fee does not quite cover the costs of doing the experiments.)  Experiments are started at approximately one-month intervals.  Although an effort is made to accommodate everyone as quickly as possible, there is a queue for sample submission, and a delay occasionally occurs.  In order to reserve a spot in the crystallization queue, you must return a completed high-throughput screening order form and wait for instructions telling you when your sample(s) can be submitted.  Click the appropriate button to download the HTS Order Form.  For more information, contact the HTS Lab (htslab@hwi.buffalo.edu).

Information will not be publicly disclosed regarding any sample received for crystallization trials without the expressed written consent of the investigator(s).  However, investigators will be asked to give certain information about the target protein for inclusion in the crystallization database that is being compiled as part of the ongoing research program in crystal growth at HWI.  (Participation is voluntary, but is strongly encouraged and deeply appreciated.)  The database is composed largely of results from experiments conducted in the high-throughput laboratory, and it will be used to predict crystallization recipes for proteins that have never been crystallized successfully. The prediction algorithm depends on the identification of proteins that have been crystallized and are similar to the problem at hand.  Measures of similarity based on biochemical and biophysical properties are being devised.

If the high-throughput screening facility assists you in identifying initial crystallization conditions, then to help us track the use and success of the screening laboratory, we ask you to please reference the following article:

Luft, J. R., Collins, R. J., Fehrman, N. A., Lauricella, A. M., Veatch, C. K. & DeTitta, G. T. (2003). A deliberate approach to screening for initial crystallization conditions of biological macromolecules. J. Struct. Biol. 142, 170-179.  [PubMed]